About Contact us Directory A-Z Index Help
 

PHIL2300 – Political and Social Philosophy pdf

Credits: 3 (3/0/0)
Description: Meets MnTC Goal Areas 5 and 7. This course addresses issues with regards to a critical examination of some philosophical problems concerning the nature and evaluation of social and political organizations over the course of human history. The course will explore a detailed philosophical analysis of the writings (both classical and contemporary) about social and political concepts such as freedom, democracy, socialism, communism, fascism and anarchy with a particular interest in the evolution of these concepts. Questions concerning the nature, justification and limits of political power will be explored. In addition to this, theories of distributive justice, culpability, causality and responsibility will be examined in connection with the study of important political and social positions.
Prerequisites: (None)
Corequisites: (None)
Competencies:
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the political spectrum.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the structure of institutional dynamics and how this affect power relations between diverse groups.
  3. Identify and analyze their own belief systems with regards to stereotypes about diverse groups and how that relates to racism, bigotry and/or related concepts.
  4. Synthesize a position between two alternative theories.
  5. Distinguish, evaluate and critique theories from both the political left and right.
  6. Describe and articulate the positions of those who have had difficulties having their positions heard within the social and political systems.
  7. Develop alternative positions to the "main stream" political discourse for the issues discussed.
  8. Understand and articulate the theories examined and how they affect society.
  9. Identify the dangers of discrimination and exclusion within our political and social institutions for the entire society.
MnTC goal areas:
  • (5) History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences
  • (7) Human Diversity

« back to course outlines